Jump to content

And, Just in Time for Shark Week....


ccarlson

Recommended Posts

Great White sharks are found in our waters though not in significant numbers. Remember that you are much more likely to have a fatal accident driving to/from your paddle than you are to be bitten by, or probably even see, a shark of any breed (or gender).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>Great White sharks are found in our waters though not in

>significant numbers. Remember that you are much more likely

>to have a fatal accident driving to/from your paddle than

>you are to be bitten by, or probably even see, a shark of

>any breed (or gender).

The odds may be changing. the seal population is exploding

For eample from: http://www.workingwaterfront.com/article.a...toryID=20021004

"In the early 1970s, the seal population was reduced to an estimated 5,000 animals in Maine waters; hence, their inclusion in the MMPA. But now, according to a study conducted by James Gilbert of the Department of Wildlife Ecology at University of Maine at Orono and Gordon Waring of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, the population has exploded, with nearly four times as many seals actually counted in 2001 (38,011) as in 1981 (10,540). Gilbert and his colleagues estimate there was a total of approximately 100,000 seals, the majority harbor seals, in New England waters during May and June of 2001. To obtain this figure, they used aerial surveys to count all visible seals and radio tags to track the movement of other seals under water, which provided a way of estimating the number not visible in the photos."

Great whites like to eat seals and they are expected to follow the seal population in closer to shore. It may be already starting see:http://www.nesurf.com/Articles/news_full.php?id=134

"GREAT WHITE EATS SEAL OFF CAPE

07/18/06

There has been a confirmed sighting of a 15 Ft Great White Shark 50 ft from shore taking a seal. It was reportedly seen south of Lighthouse Beach in Chatham, MA and witnessed by at least 15 people. Just when you thought it was safe to go into the water...

More info here and here."

This provides an addition motivation for learning a roll so you get out of the water fast. ;-)

Ralph Cohn

Elaho DS, blue & white with yellow trim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

guys come on, we're trying to get newer people out on the water and now they're going to be looking for great whites in marblehead!!!!! way to go :)

actually you've scared the crap out of me . . . i'm off to go install torpedo tubes in my kayak and a suit of chain mail for me . . .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We were teaching a class of 12 children on Monday off Revere Beach when we noticed 3 helicopters milling about just to the south for about 20 minutes. When we got back to the beach, there were many relieved parents. As it turned out, some sharks of significant size had been spotted there for the second time, so the news helicopters where hoping to get some footage. Reports of the cause of the presence of the helicopters got back to the parents, so they were quite nervous since we were out of sight around the corner.

-Dee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

actually, when I asked about Salem Sound, I was kind of half-kidding...

Fore-warned is fore-armed, just means I need lots more skill sessions, and probably an upgrade to a more manuverable boat before I do anything too adventurous...

Heidi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

>...between a 6'-8' long seal and a 15'-18' sea kayak. GWSs

>may not be the brightest creatures on the planet, but I

>doubt they'll confuse any of us for seals.

The aren't likely to confuse us with seals, but they don't know what we are and may try to find out. Lacking hands, they tend to do a test bite to evaluate whether something is good to eat. There was a published story about a California kayaker whose boat was bitten, does anyone have a link to it?

Doesn't worrying about a two foot long spiny dogfish seem silly in light of this discussion?

Ralph Cohn

Elaho DS, blue & white with yellow trim

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How timely! I've just finished re-reading "The Devil's Teeth" by Susan Casey, which is about Great Whites (and those that study and love them)off the Farrallon Islands in N. California.

Ten years ago a large Great White ("The Landlord" as it's known in surfer-ese) female drowned in a net and was brought in to Beverly for a necropsy.

Their size is amazing -- as long as my Explorer LV (and longer), but up to eight feet wide and six feet deep. They are warm blooded and can live quite comfortably in our waters.

Makes the Mako, Blue and Spiny Dogfish -- not to mention more than a few kayaks -- look like a toy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...