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Animated Knot Resource


scamlin

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Brian:

I don't know the name of the hitch, but it has two bights under load and a free end that can be tugged to release line without the "handle" end needing to go around the anchor.

The application is one we've debated over the years: how to fasten a short contact tow to a deck line in a way that still gives you a quick release under load.

Steve Maynard showed it to us in Georgia last year, but I still can't tie it reliably.

Scott

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And in addition to the knots that Brian mentions, which are very usefull and are very good hitches to have available to you, there is the Truckers hitch it is mentioned and demonstrated on the web site

here;http://www.animatedknots.com/truckers/index.php?LogoImage=LogoGrog.jpg#.

This could be the knot you were looking for as it has several names.

It is excellent for tying down ones kayak to ones vehicle as well as having several other uses.

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>I don't know the name of the hitch, but it has two bights

>under load and a free end that can be tugged to release line

>without the "handle" end needing to go around the anchor.

>

>The application is one we've debated over the years: how to

>fasten a short contact tow to a deck line in a way that

>still gives you a quick release under load.

>

>Steve Maynard showed it to us in Georgia last year, but I

>still can't tie it reliably.

Ditto on all the above. After being taught this -- informally -- I was fully able to tie it. I am now fully unable. Guess I should have practiced it more. Anyway, I hope we can track it down.

--David

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Well, this presentation isn't as slick as the animated knots site but I think this is the knot that you are talking about.

http://www.teamnorthatlantic.com/n2_2knots.html

Cheers,

Jed

The ability to defend our beliefs with absolute certainty . . .

   . . . is often inversely proportional to our level of experience.

Edited 12/31/05

The link has been updated to a new formatted page.

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Got it -- thanks Jed!

This doesn't strike me as the way I learned it, not from Steve, but is sure easy to remember -- daisy chain links in order from the release, load and release sides.

Hmmm... will it work to eliminate the first release side link, so it's only load and release side links. Seems to hold as well against a line, but perhaps not so well on a pole, where the release-side link can get pulled through the load-side link. Also, maybe it's more susceptible to coming loose when slack. OK, I'll stick to your version. But this playing around is helping burn it in my memory.

Thanks. --David.

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David,

I tried the 2-bight version and it seemed to hold but was harder to get / keep the knot tight. But it's certainly worth a try. I guess it boils down to whether or not the release loop can be pulled through the "load-side" loop. You may be right, I seem to remember Steve saying "load-side, then release-side". I guess the extra loop is just my version of his knot. I do like the extra security and bullet-proof structure of the first "release-side" loop version though . .

Cheers,

Jed

The ability to defend our beliefs with absolute certainty . . .

   . . . is often inversely proportional to our level of experience.

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>Is this used noramlly on another line such as a deckline or

>to a bracket of some form on the deck?

I've been practicing this evening attaching it to a fairly taut line, a biner and a one-inch pole (a leg of my computer work table). Seems fine on all of them.

>Couldn't it be used

>to attach the towline to a waist tow belt as well?

I don't see why not, assuming you can reach around behind you to tie it, or certainly to release it. But why would you want to, given that tow belts generally have quick-release buckles? Hmmm... I guess you'd not be putting the belt at the same risk of loss as the line.

--David.

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>

>I don't see why not, assuming you can reach around behind

>you to tie it, or certainly to release it.

I was thinking it would be tied in front with a long free end and then swung around.

> But why would you

>want to, given that tow belts generally have quick-release

>buckles? Hmmm... I guess you'd not be putting the belt at

>the same risk of loss as the line.

Bingo! Its not loss so much since you are likely to get the line back with a little luck, but that way you have the point of connection still with you to use quickly if things get regrouped after a release.

Ed Lawson

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The 3-bight version definitely works better against a large pole. In fact, I tried the 2-bight version around my thigh, and it consistently came loose. The 3 bights allows the knot to sit a bit out in space rather than snug against the pole; snug against a thick pole is almost impossible.

The last remaining question in my mind is ~which~ extra first bight: release-side or load-side? But doing two load-side links in a row makes it hard to sung, and that's important to the knot's functioning. So Jed's version wins -- release-load-release.

--David.

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>The last remaining question in my mind is ~which~ extra

>first bight: release-side or load-side? But doing two

>load-side links in a row makes it hard to sung, and that's

>important to the knot's functioning.

Did you also get the impression that without being able to make the load side quite snug the potential for the knot to "fall out/apart" under cyclical loading as in towing a boat in waves was a definite possibility?

Ed Lawson

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>

>>The last remaining question in my mind is ~which~ extra

>>first bight: release-side or load-side? But doing two

>>load-side links in a row makes it hard to sung, and that's

>>important to the knot's functioning.

>

>Did you also get the impression that without being able to

>make the load side quite snug the potential for the knot to

>"fall out/apart" under cyclical loading as in towing a boat

>in waves was a definite possibility?

Yes, against a pole (1-inch tested) the 2-bight version does fall apart under cyclic loading, but the 3-bight version seems fine. Against a line, 2-bights seems to hold fine.

So, my tentative conclusion -- 3 bights is definitely better than 2, but 2 is probably OK on a deck line.

--David.

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Scott,

From the time-stamps it looks like you were acccessing the file just as i was updating the site. I just checked at 7:20pm and the link worked. You should be able to take a look whenever you want now. I won't be doing any maintainance tonight. ;-) Have a great evening, stay safe! I hope you find the article usefull.

Cheers,

Jed

www.teamnorthatlantic.com

>Link does not work for me Dec 31 at 6 PM. Looks like it got

>caught up in the new website.

>

>When it's working, I'd like to see the illustration.

>

>Best,

>Scott

The ability to defend our beliefs with absolute certainty . . .

   . . . is often inversely proportional to our level of experience.

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