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  1. Today
  2. rfolster

    2019 Pool Sessions

    The last pool session for this season had to be rescheduled to this Saturday, March 30th between 1:00-3:00pm. There are spaces available, so if you would like to get in one last session before the kayaking season begins, you can purchase through the Store until all spots are sold.
  3. Pintail

    Astral Brewer water shoes...

    So...a half-size up should do the trrrrick! Thanks, Keith.
  4. Yesterday
  5. pitt16

    NDK Explorer Kayaks

    G’day and thanks much for the information regarding the NDK Explorer kayak. I really appreciate reading details regarding the kayak from those who have first hand experience....Regards,
  6. kattenbo

    NDK Explorer Kayaks

    2010 - 2012 Explorers don't really qualify as old models - I had a 1996 "Romany Explorer" (bought new) up until last year when the weight (70 lbs+ with the keel strip, etc. I added) just got to be too much. Fun fact: I got a kick when a younger paddler asked me if I had photoshopped the name decal on the boat - he'd only ever seen Romany and Explorer as separate names - in 1996 there was the Romany and the Romany Explorer. The basic hull and cockpit have remained unchanged. The skeg has changed a couple of times - oldest models had an external skeg control line (not cable) that ran along the deck and down to the skeg. The skeg bungee was also externally accessible. I still think it was a great approach - simple, straight forward and it made the entire skeg mechanism was field repairable. There are now HV and LV versions which do vary slightly in length, width and depth. They are heavy lay ups, even now. Which makes sense if you've ever seen what's considered a "sand" beach in the UK. I loved mine because it didn't need any babying - made a great ice breaker. If you're looking for a new boat, we've got a couple at the shop (Newbury Kayak and Canoe) (and a 3 piece take apart model on display). We don't have any used boats in stock, but there are other shops around that do as well as private sellers.
  7. kattenbo

    Astral Brewer water shoes...

    I've got a pair of Brewers to wear at the shop (Newbury Kayak and Canoe) when I started there in 2016. Needed something for both the waterfront and in the shop and they've worked out great. Can wade right in and then walk out and by the time I get to the shop they not only are drained by partially dry. Also, the quick drain features mean that a lot less water is carried into the boats and the low profile helps me fit my good sized feet into a lot of different boats. I normally wear an 11.5 and went a half size up to a 12 and the length was fine. But milage may vary depending on the particulars of your feet. I did find the width tight for the first season, but they loosened up and are now really comfortable. I'd suggest you give Astral a call direct - every time I did they were very friendly and helpful - even spoke to Spencer the guy in the video when he picked up the phone. I now also have a pair of Astral Porters, not for any good reason, just liked the look. - also in a 12. I've worn both in kayaks and canoes.
  8. Where on earth did they come up with the name "Brewer", I wonder? Obviously no link with ale that <I> can see... However, I need advice from users of these shoes, please. I bought a pair size 8 (because that <is> my regular size) and they are far too small in the length, with my big toe sticking right up hard against the front. Anyone else have this problem? Should I go a half-size up -- or even a full size? I am fairly sure that there <are> some Astral users here? Thanks in advance for any advice. Anyone wanting to buy (cheap) a pair of men's size 8 in black?
  9. Pintail

    Mitts/Gloves for Spring/Fall

    <I must be getting old...> You are, mate, you are!
  10. Brian Nystrom

    Mitts/Gloves for Spring/Fall

    I typically purchase glue from the same source as the seals (www.ossystems.com/maintenance-repair/drysuit-seals/), but Aquaseal or Goop should work. I wouldn't use contact cement for this particular application. I just looked on their site and the DLS-2 wrist seals aren't in the price list. If you click on the little "Add" button in the listing, they'll be added to your cart at $33/pair. You may want to call them, just to make sure that they're in stock. They list neoprene wrist seals, but I didn't see any pics of them.
  11. Ken

    Winter reading

    In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex by Nathaniel Philbrick. True story of a whaling ship that was rammed by a sperm whale then sank and the journey of the surviving crew to get back to land. Supposedly this historical event inspired Herman Melville to pen Moby Dick. And don't forget the classics. For one thing, they are free on https://www.gutenberg.org/. Moby Dick is a spectacular read, 200 pages of plot and 600 pages of square-rigger and whaling trivia. With all the kitchty pirate pop culture, I decided to go back to the original and am currently reading Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson.
  12. gyork

    Winter reading

    Lost in the Wild by Cary Griffith Eagle Scout and trip guide Dan Stephens disappears without a trace in the summer of 1998, after a quick dash into the woods in search of a portage in Quetico Provincial Park. Not far south from Dan, 3 years later, medical student Jason Rasmussen follows an abandoned path on his October solo backpacking trip, becomes lost and confused. Read about what they each did to survive 3 and 7 nights, respectively, in the unforgiving landscape of Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, and, like Where You'll Find Me, the devoted efforts of SAR responders from near and far. [Brought to my attention from Prudence's recommendation in NSPN Trip Report dated 3.3.19]
  13. Last week
  14. SEA SHERPA KAYAK EARLY SEASON DISCOUNTS The lingering winter frequently has a chilling effect (pun) on cold clime paddle events. The Baja Bash (3/10-3/16) was a rocking hit, at least partially due to the warm weather setting. That said, there are a few spots left open in each of our next two classes so we have decided to counter by offering local club discounts. If you are a member in good standing of a New England based club, you are entitled to a 15% discount good for the following events:- POLAR PADDLE PRACTICUM 4.0 4/12 – 4/14 SOUTH COAST MAINEThis is a gift that keeps on giving. Now on it’s fourth iteration, we are trying out new locals and going back to our roots on programming. We’ve eliminated the Leadership Tract and are laser focused making sure paddlers get what they want and need on open water.South coast Maine is a fantastically beautiful area which is underutilized by the paddle community. Part instructional, part exploratorium, participants will have the opportunity to work with instructors to help pick the days’ venues and quantify what makes them tick. Paddlers will work in similarly experienced pods allowing all to push within their comfort zones.Participants will be staying together in a comfy house in Old Orchard Beach. It's a nice town and close enough to venue options to allow access to all sorts of great paddling.SKILL LEVEL: Advanced beginners to advanced intermediate open water paddlers.PRICE: $700 minus a $105 discount- ROCKS, SURF, RACES 5/10-5/12 FISHERS ISLAND SOUND AND COASTAL RIHome to the awesome tide races of the Fishers Island Sound, surf beach venues along the RI south coast and Narragansett Bay and scenic rock gardening on the southern tip of Jamestown, we’ll go where conditions are best and paddler interest is highest. The focus of this event is to increase comfort and expand capacities in open water. This is a complex and varied set of venues, allowing a great opportunity for participants to hone their conditions forecasting skills.Tim Gleason, skilled active water coach from RI, joins Gerry to host this event in their native waters. As a marine scientist who grew up on the water and experienced sea leader with international experience, he brings a unique perspective to coaching. Gerry and Tim love paddling this area and are appreciative of the wide variety of condition options.This event will be housed either at a house or cabins at a camp depending on sign up levels.SKILL LEVEL: Advanced beginners to intermediate open water paddlers.PRICE: We are still working out housing so final price is TBD. Will be somewhere in the $750 range minus a 15% discount for those needing housing. Local club members that are day players not needing housing will pay $525 minus a 15% discount.As always, check the calendar on our website for updates and additions at SeaSherpaKayak.com.You can reach out to Gerry directly at Gerry At Sea Sherpa Kayak Dot ComHave a great and safe 2019 paddle season.
  15. I found this video on making drive gloves from Showa 660s; of course it's in some germanic/norse language I don't understand. But the the visual are good. What I don't know is what kid of glue, whether any flexible contact cement, like Household Goop, work or something specific like Aquaseal. The video also compared conical seals and bottle-shaped seals but not understanding the audio, I don't know if both or jut on of the two Ismail recommended.
  16. rylevine

    Pogies

    Jim, I find my hands are colder when I put gloves inside the pogies. I think it is a combination of less circulation and blocking the hand-heated environment of the inside of the pogies. After a while, if the pogies get wet and/or my hands become otherwise chilled (eg by taking them out of the pogies), I change out to gloves at lunch. I find that the cloth-lined NRS gloves are easiest to put on over cold and wet hands. Bob
  17. beckt

    Bold Coast / Cobscook Paddle 2019

    add me to this wait listed group please, thanks.... actually just was reminded that the dates don't work for me.... carry on
  18. Suz

    Pogies

    My personal favorites are combining the Kokatat Pogies in the fabric with a glove. The weight of the glove is dependent on the temperature and wind. To make the pogies a bit easier to get in/out of, I do the unthinkable - I cut the elastic from the inside. They have this elastic to "blouse" the pogie. BUT if you take a seam ripper and pick the stitches, you can cause it to open up more for ease of getting on/off. I know that seems drastic but it makes all the difference. For a glove, I use the glacier glove Ice Bay - without any shiny bits on the palm. Just raw neoprene. To make them last longer, you can aquaseal the seams. I don't bother as I don't want them lumpy but others I know have done so.
  19. Brian Nystrom

    Mitts/Gloves for Spring/Fall

    Here's a post I made on Paddling.com several years ago, that contains more details about the gloves. I apparently had the orange and blue gloves confused in my post from yesterday. I use the orange gloves (double-dipped) for greater dexterity. I must be getting old...😕
  20. Brian Nystrom

    Mitts/Gloves for Spring/Fall

    I haven't looked into commercial dry gloves in quite a while, but there used to be a pretty substantial price difference, as the Atlas gloves are dirt cheap. Nobody was using the orange gloves the last time that I looked. If you have a dry suit, you'll probably need the seal cement at some point to replace worn out wrist or neck seals. Unfortunately, I don't seem to have any pics of the gloves I made.
  21. Sounds like a fun project but when done buying the gloves, seals, and adhesive, not much cheaper. But then you get want and it makes fun to build yourself.
  22. I love the boundary waters! I've only been there once, but it was wonderful, I will definitely be going back. I agree, navigation can be tricky, and portages can be rough and tricky to find, our trip was honestly the toughest back packing trip I have ever been on! I was very glad I had brought sturdy boots for the portage trails. We saw very few people though in 8 days of travel. Next time I'll take less, and a lighter boat. It's a wonderful area. I'd love to got there in winter too!
  23. kate

    NDK Explorer Kayaks

    I have an older Explorer LT (bought used in 2010, don't know the age). Agree it is one heavy boat. The only design change I'm aware of is that newer boats use a different skeg system. Which IMO is a good move, as the old one requires a lot of babying to remain functional, and jams easily. I suspect that this boat will last longer than I will....
  24. Rmrand

    Bold Coast / Cobscook Paddle 2019

    Please wait list me. I may be optioning for the hikes versus paddling based on the conditions. Thanks, Romaine
  25. Brian Nystrom

    Mitts/Gloves for Spring/Fall

    I just use commercially available latex wrist seals, the same as I use on my dry suit. They're glued on in the same manner. When sourcing Atlas gloves, you may find them with attached liners. They're easy to remove and replace. As I mentioned, I like to use wool liners and I typically carry a spare pair two switch to when the first pair gets damp.
  26. That's kinda interesting. Back in the 80s I was big into windsurfing and hated neoprene gloves as they made the boom grip thicker and my hands got tired much more easily. A bunch of us just ended up using regular rubber dishwashing gloves. Didn't try to keep totally dry, just keep the wind off so either tuck into wetsuit cuff or use a few rubber bands around the wrists. Is there a tutorial online anywhere for how to make the seals?
  27. Inverseyourself

    Bold Coast / Cobscook Paddle 2019

    Please put me on the waiting list. It seems I only found out about this now 🙂
  28. EEL

    PLB

    Some random thoughts: VHF is technically not limited to line of sight communication, but I suppose it is a decent rule of thumb. For example, I once clearly heard a securite call from a vessel at the north end of Deer Isle when I was near Little Cranberry south of MDI. On the other hand, as others have indicated, range can be surprising, if not distressingly, limited at times. With a repeater on a high antenna, for example the tower on Swans or on top of Mt. Washington, a little handheld unit can communicate over a long distance as in excess of 50 miles. Don't expect a lobster boat to hear a call on 16 even if it is within easy "earshot". Automated radio check stations are handy, but they also hindered by coverage limitations. I have used the one in Portsmouth, but it was sketchy. The Rescue 21 system had, I believe, a design objective of being able to copy a signal from a one watt signal one foot above sea level 20 miles off shore. Don't count on it, and topography creates many dead zones off the coat of Maine as the coverage map shows. Communication via digital systems can work well when the signal strength is so low as to be totally useless via FM voice. Which is why DSC is a very good thing. Although it is illegal to use a radio contrary to FCC regulations and the penalties can be severe, there is almost no restriction on buying radios and enforcement varies widely While someone using a VHF marine radio on land might not be bothered by a visit from law enforcement, illegally operating a VHF handheld on the VHF aviation channels may well. Ed Lawson
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